Archives for posts with tag: Landscape

Clare Woods @ Modern Art

Clare Woods is an artist that is tottering on the edge of stardom. She’s been taken under the wing of some of the arts biggest movers and shakers. Popular with young collectors, popular with old collectors. Just generally all round popular.

She has made some pretty monumental paintings in her time. Haunting landscapes that capture an unusual feeling, like when you’re a kid and you find a secret place in the forest and get butterflies in your stomach. It feels like the spirit of Peter Lanyon is there watching over the works, which is a good thing.

Her technique of spreading flows of oil paint onto metal is an interesting one and works to obscure the naturalistic details of her subject matter and transform them into more abstract territories. For her new show at Modern Art, Woods has made a series of smaller paintings under the moniker “The Bad Neighbour”

These new paintings don’t punch me in the stomach like previous works have. Most obviously the lack of scale causes me to focus more on the technique than i might do normally and i don’t think it holds up on a small canvas. The lack of detail purposefully employed to suggest abstraction ends up suggesting a lack of craft.

I feel perhaps Woods may need to adjust course if she continues to paint small works. Perhaps that gap should be filled by her drawings which i’ve seen and are lovely.

This exhibition is now finished.

www.modernart.net

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Guy Allott @ Madder 139

I caught this exhibition a couple of weeks ago on a sunny Saturday. They seem to be few and far between these days (sigh). Madder 139 is a tastefully converted victorian structure which, with the strategic inclusion of some Velux windows, literally glowed with the warmth of the sunshine.

Guy Allott paints what he describes as “half real” places. Part landscape, part surrealist adventure. Psyche meets Vista. Some of the canvases exhibit rich fauvist palettes and Van Gogh like brush work, but these gestural brush strokes only reveal themselves when you inspect them more closely.

Other works remain brightly coloured but monochromatic. It’s interesting to see the two disciplines of landscape painting and illustrative surrealism coexist on the same canvas.

When I’m faced with a beautiful view the things that run through my mind are often anything but related to what’s in front of me. That for me is where Allott finds a sweet spot. These paintings present a fairly truthful representation of the human conciseness in action.

Well that’s my opinion anyway. Care to input?

The exhibition has finished.

www.madder139.com