Archives for posts with tag: landscape paintings

Patrick Caulfield @ Tate Britain

Three words..

PC2

Brilliant.

 PC 3

Brilliant.

 

PC 1

Brilliant.

Still can’t get my head around Gary Hume though.

http://www.tate.org.uk

Clare Woods @ Modern Art

Clare Woods is an artist that is tottering on the edge of stardom. She’s been taken under the wing of some of the arts biggest movers and shakers. Popular with young collectors, popular with old collectors. Just generally all round popular.

She has made some pretty monumental paintings in her time. Haunting landscapes that capture an unusual feeling, like when you’re a kid and you find a secret place in the forest and get butterflies in your stomach. It feels like the spirit of Peter Lanyon is there watching over the works, which is a good thing.

Her technique of spreading flows of oil paint onto metal is an interesting one and works to obscure the naturalistic details of her subject matter and transform them into more abstract territories. For her new show at Modern Art, Woods has made a series of smaller paintings under the moniker “The Bad Neighbour”

These new paintings don’t punch me in the stomach like previous works have. Most obviously the lack of scale causes me to focus more on the technique than i might do normally and i don’t think it holds up on a small canvas. The lack of detail purposefully employed to suggest abstraction ends up suggesting a lack of craft.

I feel perhaps Woods may need to adjust course if she continues to paint small works. Perhaps that gap should be filled by her drawings which i’ve seen and are lovely.

This exhibition is now finished.

www.modernart.net

Matthew Musgrave @ Supplement

I’ve got a lot of respect for painters. Sat in a studio wondering what to put on a blank canvas must be daunting. I like solving problems, but I can’t come up with the problem AND the solution, that’s just too much.

Matthew Musgrave can, it seems. His work is concerned with what to paint, how to paint and how to progress. His paintings feel like performative acts. At first you may think that he has generated them in a flurry of brushstrokes, a spontaneity that is rather attractive. But looking at them in depth reveals more structure. They seem almost algorithmic. Slowly varying patterns of movement, colour and mark making. It’s a painterly routine that evolves through the course of each work and Musgrave paints the same scene more than once to fully investigate the subject.

Some of the works could be interpreted as landscape paintings, but in actuality are small sections of his studio, or objects contained within it. The interpretation of what he is painting, i think, is key to his work. He paints what he sees, as he sees it in his mind. The viewer is then subsequently challenged to interpret the painting themselves, to decide what they are looking at. It works like a chinese whisper. The emotional effect equally so. One always finds delight in how that initial whisper can evolve into something unexpected and unlike anything you might be able to imagine.

(this image from Supplement website)

Go on, pop down and have a look. My photos don’t do the work justice.

 

Till Aug 12th

supplementgallery.co.uk